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Procedures to Aid Withdrawal

In addition to vitamins and minerals, Objective Processes are a very important part of a successful withdrawal from drugs.

Objective means having to do with physical objects and outward things, not one’s thoughts and feelings.

A process is an exact sequence of actions or directions (a sequence is the order in which things happen) to bring a result.

So Objective Processes are procedures that help a person take his attention off himself and put it outward, onto his surroundings.

Drugs push a person into experiences of the past and stick his attention in those moments. Objective Processes help unstick him from the past and pull his attention outward into the present.

Objective Processes help a person get into present time so he is more aware of his present surroundings and other people. The more a person is able to face the present, and not be stuck in the past, the more he can enjoy life. He can be in better communication with his surroundings as they exist now, not as they existed in the past. This is a good thing for anyone to achieve. For someone who has suffered the harmful effects of drug-taking, it can be life-changing.

It is best to do these processes in a quiet place where you are not likely to be interrupted, and with enough time to do the process until the person being helped has good indicators and has had a cognition. Indicators are circumstances that take place during a process which indicate (point out or show) whether it is going well or badly. The person looking brighter or more cheerful, for example, has good indicators. A cognition is a new realization about life. It is a “What do you know, I…” statement; something a person suddenly understands or feels.

These processes are very effective when given several times a day to help get the person through the period of withdrawal from drugs. Withdrawal usually takes about a week or less.

For example, you could give a person one of these processes in the morning, and some hours later, give him another. A person going through withdrawal often sleeps much more than usual, especially at the beginning. Therefore, do not overdo giving these processes. Two or three Objective Processes each day during the whole of the withdrawal period should be enough to get a result.

Five Objective Processes are given in what follows. The word command, as used here, means an exact instruction given to a person to follow as part of a process.

“Notice That”

This process directs a person’s attention off his body and out onto his surroundings. The procedure is as follows:

  1. Tell the person you are going to give him an Objective Process and briefly explain the procedure.
  2. The command used is:

    “Notice that ______ (indicated object).”

    Ensure he understands it.
  3. Indicate an obvious object by pointing to it. Tell the person, “Notice that ______ (object).”
  4. When the person has done so, acknowledge him by saying, “Thank you” or “Okay” or “Good,” etc.
  5. Continue giving the command, directing the person’s attention to different objects in the area. Be sure to acknowledge the person each time after he has carried out the command.

    For example, say:

    “Notice that chair.”

    “Thank you.”

    “Notice that window.”

    “All right.”

    “Notice that floor.”

    “Very good.”

    And so on.
  6. Continue the process until the person being helped has good indicators and has had a cognition.

    You can end the process at this point. Tell the person, “End of process.”

A Havingness Process

Havingness is the feeling that one owns or possesses. It can also be described as the idea of being able to reach or not being prevented from reaching. This process puts a person’s attention onto the area around him so he can have it. The procedure is as follows:

  1. Tell the person you are going to give him an Objective Process and briefly explain the procedure.
  2. The command used is:

    “Look around here and find something you could have.”

    Ensure he understands it.
  3. Give the command, “Look around here and find something you could have.”
  4. When the person has done so, acknowledge him by saying, “Thank you” or “Okay” or “Good,” etc.
  5. Continue giving the command. Be sure to acknowledge the person each time after he has carried out the command.

    For example, say:

    “Look around here and find something you could have.”

    “Thank you.”

    “Look around here and find something you could have.”

    “Good.”

    “Look around here and find something you could have.”

    “All right.”

    “Look around here and find something you could have.”

    “Very good.”

    And so on.
  6. Continue the process until the person being helped has good indicators and has had a cognition.

    You end the process at this point. Tell the person, “End of process.”

“Touch That”

This process is done with both persons walking about, or if the person being helped is not able to walk, they may be seated at a table with a number of objects placed on its surface. The procedure is as follows:

  1. Tell the person you are going to give him an Objective Process and briefly explain the procedure.
  2. The command used is:

    “Touch that ______ (indicated object).”

    Choose different objects in the room for the person to touch.

    Ensure the person understands the command.
  3. Give the command, “Touch that ______ (indicated object).”
  4. When the person has done so, acknowledge him.
  5. Continue giving the command. Be sure to acknowledge the person each time after he has carried out the command.

    For example, say:

    “Touch that table.”

    “Thank you.”

    “Touch that chair.”

    “Good.”

    And so on.
  6. Continue the process until the person being helped has good indicators and has had a cognition. You end the process at this point. Tell the person, “End of process.”

Touch and Let Go on Room Objects

This is a very good technique and will raise the person’s reality on the objects in the room. The procedure is as follows:

  1. Tell the person you are going to give him an Objective Process and briefly explain the procedure.
  2. The commands used are:
    1. “What in the room is really real to you?”
    2. “Go over and touch it.”
    3. “Now let go of it.”
    Ensure he understands them.
  3. Give the command, “What in the room is really real to you?”
  4. When the person has answered, acknowledge him.
  5. Then give the next command, “Go over and touch it.”
  6. When the person has done so, acknowledge him.
  7. Then give the next command, “Now let go of it.”
  8. When the person has done so, acknowledge him.
  9. Continue giving the commands in this sequence: a, b, c, a, b, c, etc. Be sure to acknowledge the person each time after he has carried out the command.

    For example, say:

    “What in the room is really real to you?”

    “Thank you.”

    “Go over and touch it.”

    “Good.”

    “Now let go of it.”

    “All right.”

    “What in the room is really real to you?”

    “Very good.”

    And so on.
  10. Continue the process until the person being helped has good indicators and has had a cognition.

    You end the process at this point. Tell the person, “End of process.”

“Become Curious About That”

This is a very simple and basic Objective Process. The procedure is as follows:

  1. Tell the person you are going to give him an Objective Process and briefly explain the procedure.
  2. The command used is:

    “Become curious about that.”

    Ensure he understands it.
  3. Indicate an object in the room by pointing at it and say, “Become curious about that.”

    You don’t call the object by name, you just indicate it. You don’t say, “Become curious about that chair.” You just say “Become curious about that.”

  4. When the person has done so, acknowledge him by saying, “Thank you” or “Okay” or “Good,” etc.

  5. Continue giving the command. Be sure to acknowledge the person each time after he has carried out the command.

    For example, say:

    “Become curious about that.” (Indicate an object.)

    “Thank you.”

    “Become curious about that.” (Indicate an object.)

    “Good.”

    “Become curious about that.” (Indicate an object.)

    “All right.”

    “Become curious about that.” (Indicate an object.)

    “Very good.”

    And so on.
  6. Continue the process until the person being helped has good indicators and has had a cognition.

    You end the process at this point. Tell the person, “End of process.”
  7. NOTE: In order to continue, you must complete all previous steps in this course. Your last incomplete step is
    NOTE: You had several answers that were incorrect. In order to continue, you should re-read the article and then test your understanding again.